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It’s well known that rare collectible coins have great investment potential and Australian coins are no exception. In fact some examples, such as the famous 1930 penny, are among the rarest and most valuable collectible coins to be found. In times of economic instability, investors look towards precious metals and coins for security. Coins can be volatile in the market but are often regularly seen to outperform precious metals.

 

While uncirculated coins will naturally have the highest value, there is plenty of value to be found in coins of lower quality. For example, a coin that is fairly common in the marketplace, such as an 1889 gold sovereign of average condition, will probably attract a price around 10% higher than the gold it contains. The value will certainly increase with the quality of the coin. Find the same coin in near mint condition and you can expect a return four or more times higher than the intrinsic gold value. In the market for Australian sovereigns, there are around 250 known different date and mint mark combinations, 150 of these are considered common, the rest are scarce to rare.

Gold coins are not the only ones of value to astute collectors. If you can manage to come across an average 1930 penny, expect a return in excess of $20,000. Only around 2000 of these coins made it into circulation and are now very rare. Even more so the proof edition of this coin, only six were produced. Three of these are now in private collections and are valued at over $1,000,000.

It’s not age that has the greatest influence on the value of coins, but rarity and demand in the marketplace. Australian half sovereigns can be more valuable than ancient coins. In the last 5 years some uncirculated half sovereigns have more than doubled in value. In the same period, uncirculated type 2 Adelaide pounds (not as rare as the type 1), have increased from $28,000, to $120,000.

The table below lists some examples of the investment performance of some Australian coins in recent years.

 

Value
1965

Value
1999

Value
2005

1813 - NSW Holey Dollar… VF/EF

600

37,500

125,000

1852 - Type 1 Adelaide Pound… EF

90

20,000

95,000

1855 - Type 1 Sydney Mint Sov… aUNC

230

25,000

45,000

1923 - Australian Half Penny… VF

16

1,650

4,5000

1930 - Australian Penny… VF

180

18,500

45,000

1915 - Australian Shilling… BrUNC

42

8,500

15,000

1938 - Australian Proof Crown… FDC

150

16,500

40,000

1932 - Australian Florin… BrUNC

650

17,500

24,000

1933 - Australian Shilling… BrUNC

80

9,500

17,500

1923 - Australian Halfpenny… gEF

47

7,500

27,500

1919 - Aus. Sixpence… BrUNC

70

1,950

3,500

1893S - Victoria Proof Sov… FDC

300

21,000

55,000

1914 - Florin… BrUNC

34

4,500

8,500

The Layman’s Guide To Australian Coin Values

With the Layman's Guide, the average person can have access to information that's either only available to dealers, or to those dedicated collectors that spend hours; days and even months researching the market. Download it now, and within minutes you can be checking your coins and notes to see just how much they're worth.

This eBook has been written specifically for sellers of coins and notes. You'll have impartial and accurate information on the value of your whole collection

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Copyright Steven Cousley 2008
PO Box 450 Young NSW, Australia